May 19, 2024

Germany “Persuades” the EU to change it’s stance on CO-2

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Static photo Color: Solar sky

Static photo Color: Solar sky

The European Union (EU) has taken bold steps to combat climate change through a variety of policies, including the implementation of the CO2 emissions standard for new cars. However, the EU has recently made an exception for Germany, allowing the country to exempt internal combustion engine (ICE) powered cars from the CO2 ruling if they are climate neutral. This decision has sparked controversy and raised concerns about the consequences it could have for the fight against climate change.

The CO2 emissions standard for new cars was introduced in 2019 and aims to reduce the average CO2 emissions of new cars sold in the EU to 95 grams per kilometer by 2021. The standard applies to all new cars sold in the EU, regardless of the country of origin. However, in a recent decision, the EU allowed Germany to exempt ICE powered cars from the CO2 ruling if they are climate neutral.

The decision was made in response to Germany’s request for an exemption, citing concerns that the transition to electric vehicles would disproportionately impact its car industry. Germany is a major producer of ICE powered cars, and the country argued that the costs associated with transitioning to electric vehicles would be too high for its car manufacturers.

To qualify for the exemption, ICE powered cars must meet certain criteria, including a significant reduction in their greenhouse gas emissions. This reduction can be achieved through the use of biofuels, synthetic fuels, or other technologies that capture and store CO2 emissions.

The decision to exempt ICE powered cars from the CO2 ruling if they are climate neutral has sparked controversy, with some arguing that it undermines the EU’s commitment to combat climate change. Critics argue that the exemption will allow Germany to continue producing and selling ICE powered cars, which are major contributors to greenhouse gas emissions.

One of the key concerns is that the exemption could slow down the transition to electric vehicles, which are essential to achieving the EU’s goal of reducing CO2 emissions. Electric vehicles produce zero emissions and are considered to be a more sustainable alternative to ICE powered cars. However, the exemption could make ICE powered cars more attractive to consumers, who may be hesitant to switch to electric vehicles due to concerns about their high cost and limited range.

Another concern is that the exemption could undermine the EU’s position as a leader in the fight against climate change. The EU has been at the forefront of global efforts to combat climate change, and its policies have served as a model for other countries to follow. However, the decision to exempt ICE powered cars from the CO2 ruling if they are climate neutral could be seen as a step backward, undermining the EU’s leadership on the issue.

The exemption could also have negative consequences for public health. ICE powered cars produce a range of pollutants, including nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM). These pollutants have been linked to a range of health problems, including respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. By allowing ICE powered cars to continue to be sold without meeting the CO2 emissions standard, the exemption could contribute to air pollution and its associated health impacts.

Despite these concerns, there are some who argue that the exemption is a necessary compromise. They argue that the transition to electric vehicles will take time, and that it is important to support the car industry during this transition. They also argue that the use of biofuels and other technologies that capture and store CO2 emissions can play an important role in reducing greenhouse gas emissions in the short term.

However, even supporters of the exemption acknowledge that it is not a long-term solution. Electric vehicles are essential to achieving the EU’s goal of reducing CO2 emissions, and the exemption could delay the transition to a more sustainable transport system.

To mitigate the negative consequences of the exemption, it is important for the EU to ensure that ICE powered cars that qualify for the exemption are genuinely climate neutral. This means that the EU thinks it is competent enough to pass that kind of judgement on something so specialized, where they often really do not have a clue what they are talking about and are too easily persuaded to “change their opinion” by “donations” from the auto industry and the oil industry, both of whom have a vested interest in keeping this kind of half measure open to milk as much out the current infrastructure as possible. This is such an embarrassing change in what seemed like a very solid stance to help battle climate change. It makes you wonder what would happen if the farmers would have such a wealthy lobby going on in Brussels?

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